The Power of Rising After a Fall

A fall; to drop down suddenly to a lower position or descend under the force of gravity, I’m pretty sure everyone has felt the pain of it before. Whether the force (that led to the fall) was strong or not, I bet we can agree that a fall can be quite embarrassing. It’s easy to get over some ‘falls’ as time goes by. However, there are those special kinds of gymnastic falls that seem to leave a scar, forever.

Don’t agree? Well, remember the time when you were a kid and fell off your bicycle? Or that time when you fell flat on your face in public? Exactly… how could you ever forget that?!

No successful person has gone through life without falling or failing.

Frankly, no one could – No one is immune to a fall or failure. And being stable or balanced ‘all’ the time is just a myth. No successful person has gone through life without falling or failing. And even though falling is part of life’s learning process, the shame accompanied by it is sometimes more painful than the actual fall – How ironic!

Why do we allow a fall to make us feel ashamed? Shouldn’t we rather learn the art of embracing a fall?

Take an infant for example – According to a study done by researchers at the New York University, infants need to learn how to ‘fall’ in order to learn how to walk. Falling is all part of the ‘learning how to walk’ process. Based on this study, two groups of infants, also identified as experienced crawlers and new or novice walkers were observed while doing what you know… toddlers do best.

Apparently, the novice walkers seemed to fall more per hour than the experienced crawlers. However, while the novice walkers fell more, research showed that they actually moved more and spend more time moving than the experienced crawlers could during the entire process.

Are you an experienced crawler or a novice walker?

Based on the above scenario, we can identify the two as the following:

  • Experienced crawler: one who is fixed in their ways, afraid to fall and make mistakes and is, therefore, comfortable remaining at the same level for a longer period of time.
  • Novice walker: someone who embraces the unknown, and recognises a fall and their mistakes as an opportunity to progress, by being uncomfortable remaining at the same level for a longer period of time.
So why is it important to rise after a fall?

As an infant learns how to walk, fall and rise again, the infant begins to adopt a new strategy, a better strategy for walking. The infant then begins to progress from being a novice walker to an experienced walker. When experiencing the pain of a fall, the infant also realises that the pain does not remain, and therefore tries again and again. That same experience then teaches that there’s a better way of obtaining the goal; enabling the infant to execute something that was initially more difficult, now with a better approach.

Experiencing success is impossible without failure.

Likewise, for you and I. Experiencing success is impossible without failure. There’s no growth without change and without change, there is no motion – Slow motion is better than no motion. Both the wicked and righteous fall. However, there is a clear difference…

A righteous (morally right or good) man (or woman) falls seven times BUT rises again [Proverbs 24:16].

Many people focus on the fall and the shame the fall (sometimes) brings. Yet, the focus should not be on the fall, but on the action that follows after the fall.

The power is not in the fall, no not at all – The power, the strength, the growth, the glory and success is in the rising.

Sarah Johnson

Sarah is Founder and Editor of IAMICareer. She currently holds a BA of Commerce and has a strong background in Marketing. Sarah is passionate about seeing millennials thrive in career and the workplace and is dedicated to helping millennial women bridge the gap between university and the corporate world.

  • Malena

    Keep It Coming… The Strength of a Woman and the power of words and actions.